Caring about watches again

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So Apple is making a smart watch (let’s call it what it is, “wearable” is too clunky and best used for non-screen connected products). It’ll do well enough with early adopters whenever they launch it and regardless of battery life but more importantly it’ll test one important assumption: is the ability to pay with a watch going to get people to wear them again? Fitness and sharing your presence have failed to get the market excited because they are short-term interactions. People go on diets for weeks or exercise for a few months. Paying for things is an everyday recurring action. Maybe Watch will be the payment card killer? If they come to the UK, paying for the Underground with a watch would beat card clash but readers are all on the left, so not an obvious gesture. Maybe that’ll pave the way for NFC Apple Rings.  Oh the possibilities.

Insurance in the internet of things: the Future Stigma of Data

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In May, Ana Bradley joined my consultancy as a Partner and one of the first clients we worked on together was Imago TechMedia. We helped them plan an event for the insurance sector around the internet of things in a half day workshop. The insurance sector is one I’d recently been looking at anyway for a piece of strategy work I’m doing with the BBC R&D North Lab in MediaCityUK. In light of Cory’s post tonight  though I thought I’d share some quick thoughts on the matter.

For the past 4 years, insurance companies have been using connected hardware to offer flexible and dynamically generated premiums in the car industry.

  • In 2010, MyKey was a feature on all new Ford cars which allowed parents to lend their car to their teenager and set parameters of usage.
  • In Germany, all new cars have “black boxes” by default since a government ruling supported this in 2012.
  • These days, companies like Ingenie set up the box on any car for the young driver (17-25 year olds) in your household and charge you premiums according to their driving behaviour

Now they are looking beyond cars and into the world of healthcare insurance (after all they’d been tracking your gym attendance) and what better consumer products to exploit than the emerging bubble of wearables?

This sounds good in principle: if you’re good, and you exercise you premium will be low. But what if you’re bad for just one week because you got dumped by a significant other? You spend less time in the gym and so are automatically penalised, even if you’re doing ok overall.

What if you’re really ill? Then the insurance company might offer you a plethora of connected devices, all in the name of making you pay less while they (via the product company) collect more and more data. If we’ve got issues with the NHS holding our data, well I’m not sure we’d trust insurance providers, after all private companies who own the devices can do whatever they like with the data. Remember that back in 2011, TomTom sold its satnav data to the Dutch police who then used it to set speeding traps and retro-actively send speeding tickets. 

So people start to panic and say “No I don’t want to be traced”. So they are charged more.

And this is where a new divide occurs: a new class system determined by data. The poor are tracked and traced while the rich can afford to pay more for their premiums and for anonymity by extension. This also means wearable companies will be tainted by that industry and will come to mean “i’m too poor to pay or ill for expensive insurance so I wear a connected device”.

Might sound a little Adam Curtis, but that future is what worries me about insurance companies.

Change in times of change

I was reminded of this video which, shot in 2000, is strangely prescient of the times we live in now. The beauty of Hussein Chalayan‘s work never ends it must be said but I have a soft spot for this collection.

“Chalayan’s Afterwords Collection was inspired by the story of refugees, having to leave home in times of trouble. The transformation of furniture into dresses, carrying cases, and a skirt suggests the necessity of leaving one’s home in a hurry with nothing but the clothes on one’s back. ”

I wish more product designers and hackers dabbled with fashion in an intelligent way, rather than interpreting the idea of future clothing as touch screen gloves.

Thanks Used Magazine.

Tiny Useful Things: KeyMaps

I’ve been thinking about embodied contexts for maps lately, beyond flat paper maps.

I have 3 sets of keys that I carry around and I thought that a simple way of differentiating them would be to design location-relevant key rings. There’s such a familiarity with specific locations like the office, home, your partner’s home, that labels aren’t necessary anymore.

KeyMaps are key rings with a very focused zoomed-in map of where that key goes. The hole in the keyring is the place those keys are connected to. Around them, the area. Something that only the owner could make sense of. Granular, but not too granular.

I think they might be nice made out of wood and generated easily online somewhere.

That’s it. Happy Easter!

Tiles: Twitter as visual dictionary

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(Warning: Firmly in the “things I don’t know how to build and can’t be bothered to learn how to” category.)

I grew up flicking through the Dictionnaire Visuel on my mother’s bookshelf right next to that year’s Larousse Universel. It shaped my knowledge of words and the world beyond my bedroom in the 13ème. I grew to love writing and words, even if I still struggle with english sentence structure. When Twitter launched naming convention led to lots of people hogging famous people’s names and company names as a quick way to make money. I was interested in more common words, words that don’t matter. Seeing what people had done with them, seeing who owned them.

I took a classic William Blake poem and looked up all the words and dates as twitter users. Only “bed” was an account that had been suspended (the word “they” linked to a stupidly large image so I took that out too). I pasted the acount’s avatar next to the word. The result is interesting to me, as you could easily create a language around it, and the fact that anyone would bother registering dates as usernames is interesting. Not very many of these accounts were popular. Many came from asia. Most only had ever tweeted once. Ghost accounts for the modern dictionary. Dunno, it entertained me for a few hours as I avoid prepping for Robotlift.

Final thing here.

Tiny Useful Things: MyTravelMaps

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Hackday today at RIG with James and Phil and I thought I’d share what I came up with.

I’ve been using Google MyMaps for about 4 years now, mapping out the cities I visit and live in with pins that often relate to food and culture. I share them a lot and most of them have been viewed by thousands of people. They do however feel like the lonely Google project noone cares about. I think there is so much they could do with it if anyone cared about the implications of those maps during a travel experience. They have the data, it’s only a question of layout and a little intelligence. So I thought I’d try designing what clicking “print” should give you.

I made a prototype last friday for a weekend trip to Paris which gave me some insights but made a cleaner version today. Pics of that on Flickr.

MyTravelMaps is the size of a Moleskine so it’s compact and you can fold it in half to fit into your pocket. Design for pockets is important as Russell said.

The first page has your travel details and the name of your hotel. Nothing else. You don’t need anything else if you’re a seasoned traveller anyway.

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The other pages have the description of the pins on one side of the page, tagged according to categories (food in yellow and culture in blue) and listed from North to South to match the map, so as you travel around you kind of know what you’re likely to bump into. It also allows you to make decisions about where you’re likely to end up looking for a place to eat versus visiting museums as those areas don’t often overlap (or shouldn’t if you’re on a budget).

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This isn’t about accuracy because travel is about the things you didn’t know about, the stuff people will tell you, the hand-written notes on those maps, the unplanned. It’s building in a little less accuracy than a directions map. It’s building in fun. This is also designed for the wanderings of walking around a city, not for someone who is looking for something specifically. They’ll use their phone for that. I used 3 pieces of paper all weekend, never once taking out a phone to check where we were. That’s kindof what I’d like this to be. Small, smart and useful.

Tiny Useful Things: Radio Cards

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I did a bit of Olympics-related media thinking for a client last month and it dawned on me that the most interesting thing about that 2 weeks will be the social and cultural gap that athletes and their entourage will have to deal with, not to mention the millions of tourists. How do you make the whole experience of living in England for a short amount of time less troubling. Often, when you visit a place for a short while, you accept the cultural differences, but some of these people will be here for months, training before the events. Linguistics is not that much of a challenge and something like Point it will do a basic job. But how do you explain simple everyday things like: what should I listen to in the morning?

Radio Cards are a little set of cards attached to the aerial of a radio to remind you of the major UK radio stations.

Just a friendly tiny useful thing. It took me about 2 years before I started listening to Radio 4 and I sometimes switch to a classical channel (not sure which) when I can’t fall asleep. I had to look up the other stations for this. Radio is a funny old thing, a thing of habit. To an English person, this will make no sense because it is assumed you know these things, but from a foreigner’s perspective, every little helps.

More pics here.

Should we stop using the term "Interaction Design"?

I got this last month from Michel, a lovely student from Eindhoven:

“I am currently looking for an internship in HCI/ID, but I am suffering from a “typecasting”-effect. Many companies ask for “interaction designers” when they really mean “graphics designers” or “css monkeys”. The fact that I have a background in computer science just makes things worse by adding “programmer” to the list of stigmas. My interests lie in the more physical kinds of interaction, but it’s really hard to find the right positions for that. Do you have any advice as to how I might better find the right places? Any help would be greatly appreciated!”

This felt deeply familiar of course as when I graduated in 2006 and it was a problem even then (I ended up working as a visual designer / information architect for a year even if my portfolio of work was much more product-based).

I try to explain to people what an interaction designer is in the way that I understand it, and in the context of the business I built, it makes sense. But in isolation, it no longer means anything on the market. Physical computing is too embedded in academia and is starting to feel old. Bill Verplank had suggested Physical Interaction Design, but it sounds a little clunky. So should we be concerned by this? As per Michel’s email, i think so. Graduates become senior designers, strategists, creative directors, etc. rarely interaction designers.

Lack of terminology ultimately leads to lack of identity and the dilution of a field into the market, unnoticed. Something to think about for the start of the week :)